Tag Archive: military trivia

Military Trivia

by Carl Kurfess

Can you identify this USAF Aircraft?

Military Trivia Can you identify this USAF aircraft?
  • The Sikorsky MH-60G/HH-60C Pave Hawk is a twin-turboshaft engine helicopter in service with the United States Air Force. It is a derivative or the UH·60 Black Hawk and entered service in 1982.
  • The MH-60G Pave Hawk’s primary mission is insertion and recovery operations personnel, while the HH-60G Pave Hawk’s core mission is recovery of personnel under hostile conditions, including combat search and rescue. Both versions conduct day or night operations into hostile environments.
  • Because or its versatility, the HH-60G may also perform peacetime operations such as civil search und rescue, emergency aeromedical evacuation (MEDEVAC), disaster relief, international aid and counter-drug activities.
  • Cost is approximately $30 million each.
Military Trivia - Can you identify this USAF aircraft?

Military Trivia

(in this case, Naval) 
by Carl Kurfess 

Military Trivia

Make a pass 

Flirtatious advance. 

When naval ships-of-the-line were sizing each other up they would quite often make a side-on pass, each wishing to size up the opposition. When the expression came ashore, it was used as a tentative approach to a member of the opposite sex to gauge the likely outcome of closer engagement. 

(For you detail sensitive types, the two ships at left would actually appear to be Frigates, smaller than Ships of the line. Your friendly sailor editor) 

Military Trivia

Military Trivia

by Carl Kurfess 

Shavetail 

Inexperienced person. 

Mules have irksome and painful qualities, so those that ran the mule-trains of the mid-19th century American army would shave off the tail of any new mule as a warning to others that its behavior might be unpredictable. It was not long before the troops were using the term for any newcomer. By the time of the Spanish-American war of 1898, “Shavetail” had become specific to describe a newly commissioned lieutenant. 

Works cited: Donald, G., Wiest, A., & Shepherd, W. (2013). Sticklers, Sideburns and Bikinis: The military origins of everyday words and phrases. Bloomsbury Publishing.