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In Memoriam

General Colin Powell 1937-2021 

In Memoriam

He once said of himself, “Powell is a problem-solver. He was taught as a soldier to solve problems. So he has views, but he’s not an ideologue. He has passion, but he’s not a fanatic. He’s first and foremost a problem-solver.” 

Powell, who grew up in New York City, the son of Jamaican immigrants, served in the Army for 35 years. He was a man of many firsts: He was the first Black national security adviser, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Secretary of State. 

Military Trivia

by Carl Kurfess 

Military Trivia

The Bell AH-1 Super Cobra is a twin engine attack helicopter based on the U. S. Army’s single engine AH-1-Cobra. 

Cost is $ 10.7 million, speed 190 knots (218 mph) with a range of 365 miles. 

The AH-1 series, the backbone of the U.S. Marine’s attack helicopter fleet since 1971, is being replace by the next generation Bell AH-1Z “Viper” attack helicopter. 

Military Trivia

From the Bookshelf

by Fred Apgar

Citizen Sailors 

By Nathan Perl-Rosenthal 

In his book, Citizen Sailors, Nathan Perl-Rosenthal discusses the creation of American citizenship among mariners in post-revolution America. 

Prior to the creation of the United States, the concept of citizenship was not a major issue among seafaring nations. It was merely assumed that a mariner’s birthplace, spoken language, and country to which they were a subject, determined their nationality. However, the emergence of America as a sea power changed that assumption, which created an entirely different view of sovereignty and citizenship. America defended the right of British seamen, as well as mariners from other nations, to become American citizens. However, it was England’s view that once an individual was a British subject, they would remain so for the rest of their lives. 

Following the French Revolution in the early 1790’s, France and Great Britain went to war. America declared its neutrality and continued to trade with both. However, because of the ambiguity of determining citizenship, American sailors fell victim to both the English and French navies. Claiming them to be the enemy, American ships, cargoes, and crews were seized by both England and France as well as the numerous privateers, of both countries. Thanks to Perl-Rosenthal’s exhaustive research, readers are provided with a marvelous insight and details into the work of the privateers, impressment of American mariners, and attempts of Admiralty Courts to render “fair” decisions. 

The final chapter of the book details America’s response to Great Britain’s violations against its sovereignty. The impressment of American mariners became a national issue, and congressional legislation authorized the production of certificates of citizenship and the registration of American mariners. Interestingly, among the more than 100,000 sailors whose citizenship was protected through the registration process were more than 1800 black sailors. Unfortunately, their equal status as American citizens would fall victim to rising racism after the War of 1812. While a cumbersome process at the outset, in time, such documentation became accepted and standardized among seafaring nations. 

Edmonds Waterfront Center Flag Pole

Edmonds Waterfront Center Flag Pole

In the October newsletter you will recall a photo and short article about the purchase and presentation of a flag for the Edmonds Waterfront Center by VFW Post 8870 Auxiliary. 

That flag will be flown from the flagpole donated by three veterans organizations, among others. Ron Clyborne sent us this photo of the plaque (shown below) announcing the dedication of the flag plaza at the EWC to “Honor all Veterans”.

Edmonds Waterfront Center Flag Pole

Veterans Day is Coming

It’s Buddy Poppy Time! 

Veterans Day is Coming
Past Commanders Apgar and Crabtree at Central Market (now Town & country) in pre-COVID times.

We have gained permission from the stores to distribute Buddy Poppies for Veterans Day at four locations in our area, including QFC at Westgate in Edmonds, QFC at 196th & 76th in Lynnwood, QFC Speedway in Mukilteo and Town & Country Market (formerly Central Market) in Mill Creek. (Please note that the Fred Meyer location we used to use is not available this year)

Now we need YOUR help to staff those locations on Nov 5 & 6 with shifts from 10:00 to 14:00 and 14:00 to 17:00 at each location. Pick your store and times & sign up at the Post meeting on Oct.20 (The store scheduless were emailed to the membership and a sample appears on the following page) or email to Sr. Vice Commander Duane Bowman (dvbow@comcast.net). 

Some of us like to do one shift each day and there are always a few who choose to spend one or both days all day. We only ask that everyone do what they can. Family and friends are welcome to help as well. Please have your face mask with you. 

Be advised that we may need to move you to locations other than your first choice to even out staffing. 

Buddy Poppy Sign-UPs

All of our members should have received an email with sign-up sheets like this one attached, from which to select your location and schedule for Buddy Poppy distribution. Again, you will have an opportunity to sign up at the Post meetiing, or you can select your time and location and email to Vice Commander Duane Bowman (dvbow@comcast.net). 

The sign up sheets for the other three locations, QFC Westgate, QFC 196th & 76th and Town & Country Market (formerly Central Market) Mill Creek have exactly the same schedules, so pick your time and location and be ready to join us! 

In two early Poppy efforts at the Edmonds Summer Market, we collected $459.50 in donations on September 25 and approximately $ 1,000 on July 17. 

Buddy Poppy Sign-UPs

Among VFW members helping out those events were: Carl Kurfess, Duane Bowman, Rob Low, Phil Sacks, Dan Doyle, Mike Denton, Cal Barnard, Paul Russo. Les Abel let us into the hall to pick up the VFW canopy, poppies, tables, and chairs. 

It turns out we did not need the canopy, tables and chairs. The Market folks set them up for us free of charge. In September, we also handed out at least 3 VFW applications and 3 American Legion plus meeting information to veterans who are prospective members.

Buddy Poppy Sign-ups

Veterans Day Observance Planned

Veterans Day Observance Planned

Our Veterans Day observance will take place at the Edmonds Veterans Plaza at 11:00 AM on Veterans Day, Thursday, November 11. 

There will be short remarks from Post officers and recognition pins distributed, including the Vietnam Veteran pin and a new lapel pin that recognizes the widows of veterans, which observes the 50th anniversary of that conflict. It is The Deceased Vietnam Veteran’s Surviving Spouse pin, for the surviving spouse at the time of death of a veteran who served on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces at any time during the period of November 1, 1955 to May 15, 1975, regardless of location of service. The pin is displayed here, both front and back. 

The Post intends this to be a fairly low key event, recognizing the continuing hazard of the COVID pandemic and urges everyone participating to come with their mask and take appropriate social distancing precautions. 

In Memoriam

Richard ‘Dick’ Cassutt 

Richard ‘Dick’ Cassutt

We have learned of the recent loss of one of our members, Richard “Dick” Cassutt , a very active Life Member of the post, including as a regular participant in our bi-annual “Buddy Poppy” events and school visits. Dick was usually present at Post meetings until recently, when health issues began to catch up with him. Dick’s widow Virginia tells us he passed away on October 7. May he rest in peace. 

News from VFW 8870

Flag Donated to Edmonds Waterfront Center 

Flag Donated to Edmonds Waterfront Center

You may recall that last year VFW Post 8870 and American Legion Post 66 joined to make a substantial contribution to provide a new flag pole in front of the Edmonds Waterfront Center. The flag pole, which is well built, includes a full lighting feature to allow 24 hour display of the national ensign, has sat empty since the building opened. Now, thanks to our Auxiliary, a flag, large enough to be appropriate to the facility can be displayed. In the photo above are shown, (L to R) Mary Davenport of VFW Auxiliary District 1, 8870 Auxilary President Joe Boyett and Patsy Etheridge- Neal 8870 Sec. Treas., displaying the flag to Daneil Johnson, CEO of Edmonds Waterfront Center (not shown). 

Flag Donated to Edmonds Waterfront Center

September Post Meeting

September Post Meeting

We are having excellent participation in our monthly post meetings of late. In September, sixteen members attended in person plus another six via zoom. 

In the photo at left Post Chaplain Dan Doyle is pictured with our speaker, Matthew Durkee, Interim Director, Veteran Resource Ctr, Edmonds College, who gave us an update on the college programs in support of student veterans. 

The Legion Hall is rated for considerably more participants (50) than we are seeing, so members can feel comfortable attending in person. Again, masks are optional for vaccinated members. 

From the Bookshelf

by Fred Apgar 

The Saltwater Frontier By Andrew Lipman

The Saltwater Frontier 

By Andrew Lipman 

Andrew Lipman’s well researched book, The Saltwater Frontier, provides readers with a new and interesting way of thinking about what he refers to as America’s first frontier, the waterways and land between the Hudson River and Cape Cod. Ultimately, the Native Americans who called the area their homeland, became victims of the competition between the Dutch and English to establish its colonies. 

Lipman’s historical perspective focuses on 17th century America and the depth and breadth of his research is impressive, drawing upon archeological and historical records, as well as verbal accounts of Native American traditions, readers are introduced to the Saltwater Frontier with a discussion regarding the customs, cultures, and lifestyles of the various Native American communities that lived and thrived along its numerous waterways. 

Upon their arrival to the northeast coastline, the Dutch and English discovered a seafaring people who traversed the shorelines in their unique style of boats, harvesting the food resources provided by the ocean and river waters. It was the native “watermen” who provided valuable and much needed assistance to the newly established European communities of New Amsterdam and New England. 

Lipman concludes his discussion regarding the Saltwater Frontier with a cautionary tale about the rise and fall of the whaling industry. Benefitted by the involvement of some Native Americans, the success of the whaling industry proved to be its downfall. Overfishing led to the decline of the industry however, whaling led to the creation of other maritime jobs and, ultimately, to the survival of some Native American communities on the Saltwater Frontier and the establishment of the coastal waters of the northeast as the first settled frontier in the New World.